State Representative Avery Bourne (R-Raymond) is the Chief Sponsor of House Bill 3656 that seeks to increase the use of Illinois coal. The bill creates a taskforce to study the costs and benefits of using the latest scrubber technology to allow Illinois coal mined in our home state to be burned here as well. This legislation recently passed out of the Illinois House and is now before the Senate for consideration.
State Representative Avery Bourne(R-Raymond) is challenging local kindergarten through fifth grade students to complete her reading program to earn a free ice cream with the Representative at the end of summer. Students involved in the program are asked to read 8 books during their break from school and return their reading logs to the Representative’s office by August 1, 2017.

“Reading has such a big impact on a child’s future and hopefully this program helps to strengthen their reading skills,” said Rep. Bourne. “I would encourage kids to take my challenge; make time to take a break and get lost in a good book.”
Participants from last year are seen here with Rep. Bourne. These children from the Taylorville area
enjoyed a free cone and then had play time at the local ice cream shop.
Currently, Illinois lawmakers are required to test their knowledge of ethics laws annually by taking an ethics exam - the kicker though, they’re allowed to fail every question. State Representative Avery Bourne (R-Raymond) is the Sponsor of House Bill 526, a bill that is seeking to change this practice by requiring that lawmakers must pass the test on their first attempt.


State Rep. Avery Bourne today released the following statement on school funding reform upon the House's return to Springfield for the final month of the spring legislative session:

For years, multiple legislative commissions and committees have studied the obvious inequities of Illinois’ school funding system. As it stands now, Illinois has the most inequitable school funding system in the nation. That means students are essentially forced to play a zip code lottery that will determine whether they learn in classrooms equipped with an iPad per student or one where students share decades old textbooks. This is a challenge we need to tackle as the legislature, and there is bipartisan agreement that it must happen soon.
Representative Avery Bourne (R-Raymond) and First National Bank of Litchfield are partnering to host a free shred event at her district office on Saturday, June 10th.  The event will take place from 9 a.m. to noon and all district residents are invited to bring their confidential documents, two bags maximum, to be shredded.

“Consumer fraud and identity theft are a growing problem in our communities,” said Bourne.  “This event is an effort to prevent this type of crime from happening.  This is why I am encouraging are residents to come out and have their personal documents safely and securely destroyed at no charge.” 
 
Bourne’s district office is located at 301 North Monroe Street in Litchfield. Cars will be directed to enter the parking lot across from the post office, on Monroe Street. Participants can leave their documents to be shredded on site or park in the lot while the shredding takes place. This free service is for residential, not business, shredding only and bags will be accepted until the trucks reach capacity. 

Representative Avery Bourne (R-Raymond) is sponsoring legislation to help local farm families by repealing the estate and inheritance taxes paid on land transfers upon death.  The legislation, House Bill 432, is an effort to stop double taxation of land transfers for agricultural purposes.

Bourne’s HB432 states that if a farmer gifts his land upon death to a descendant, there is no longer a state tax due on the assessed value of the property. Currently, the rate of taxation may be as high as 51% on estate transfers (35% to the Federal Government and between 7.2% and 16% to the State Government).

Representative Bourne explains, "The estate tax in Illinois, especially at a time when small farms are struggling to stay afloat, often means that families must sell the family farm to meet their tax obligations. This adds to the overwhelming tax burden in Illinois.”  Bourne states, “This proposal grew out of a suggestion from my Agriculture Advisory Board and I am proud to bring it forward as just one more way we can make Illinois more competitive and compassionate."

The legislation would be effective immediately upon being signed into law. Currently, 18 states impose an estate tax and 32 states (including neighboring Indiana) do not.